Jubilee Tower, Castle Hill

jubilee tower

In the distance, not a million miles away from Emley Moor, you can see Jubilee Tower on Castle Hill, Huddersfield.

Jubilee Tower

By 1897 Queen Victoria had reigned over the British Empire for sixty years, longer than any other monarch. A permanent memorial of this event was planned in the form of a tower perched on the hill overlooking the town of Huddersfield. Despite some difficulty raising the money required, the tower was opened by the Earl of Scarborough on 24 June 1899. Although often referred to as the Jubilee Tower, the correct name is the Victoria Tower. Designed by Isaac Jones of London, it was built by the firm of Ben Graham and Sons of Folly Hall, using stone from Crosland Hill. It cost £3,298, and was 106 feet (32.3 m) high, which, added to the height of the hill itself, made the top 1,000 feet (305 m) above sea level.

 

Castle Hill is a Scheduled Ancient Monument situated on a hilltop overlooking Huddersfield, in the Metropolitan Borough of Kirklees. It has been settled for at least 4,000 years. Experts regard it as one of Yorkshire’s most important early Iron Age hill forts.[1] The summit of Castle Hill is by far the most conspicuous landmark in Huddersfield. The Hill has been a place of recreation for hundreds of years and the easily discernible remains of past occupation have made it a subject for legend, speculation and scientific study.

Some great pictures of the tower can be found here:

http://www.examiner.co.uk/multimedia/news/2012/09/12/castle-hill-in-rain-wind-snow-shine-and-more-86081-31821836/#6

IMAGE: http://www.examiner.co.uk/multimedia/news/2012/09/12/castle-hill-in-rain-wind-snow-shine-and-more-86081-31821836/#6