Omega, Warrington

At Junction 8 of the motorway you cannot miss the enormous buildings of the Omega development. Built on the site of the former Burtonwood Airbase. Omega is the largest mixed-use development in the North West, comprising of warehouses, logistics centres and homes.

With immediate access to the region’s motorway network from Junction 8 of the M62, it’s unrivalled location has already proved attractive to Brakes Bros, Hermes Parcelnet, Travis Perkins and Asda, all of whom have chosen the site for new regional logistics centres.

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Links:

http://www.millerdevelopments.co.uk/Omega.aspx

http://www.omegaopportunity.com/

Scout Moor Wind Farm

Scout Moor Wind Farm is the second largest onshore wind farm in the England. You will see it in the distance as you pass Rochdale.

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Creative Commons Licence [Some Rights Reserved]   © Copyright Paul Anderson and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Here is an incredible picture of the turbines on their way for installation:

scout moor wind farm

Creative Commons Licence [Some Rights Reserved]   © Copyright Paul Anderson and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

 

Emley Moor transmitting station

Emley Moor transmitting station, or the Arqiva Tower, is a telecommunications and broadcasting facility on Emley Moor, 1 mile (1.6 km) west of Emley, in Kirklees, West Yorkshire. It was built between 1969 and 1971. The station’s most visible feature is its 1,084-foot (330.4 m) tall concrete tower, which is a Grade II listed building. It is the tallest freestanding structure in the United Kingdom, 7th tallest freestanding structure in the European Union, 4th tallest tower in the European Union, and 23rd tallest tower in the world.

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Creative Commons Licence [Some Rights Reserved]   © Copyright Tim Marchant and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The tower’s official name “Arqiva Tower” is shown on a sign beside the offices at the base of the tower but it is commonly known as “Emley Moor mast”. Emley Moor position as a building or a structure is ambiguous. The tower has a top-floor interior control room at a height of 272 metres which is accessible to people.

There were two towers on the site previously. The first was built in 1956. It was replaced with a 385m tall one in 1964. Unfortunately this collapsed in March 1969. You can read more about this here.

During the Tour de France in 2014, the tower was lit up in an amazing light show.

There are some amazing pictures here.

Links:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emley_Moor_transmitting_station

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-2933043/1-084ft-high-60-mile-views-takes-EIGHT-minutes-reach-Inside-tallest-tower-Britain-s-NOT-Shard.html

 

Ouse Bridge

The Ouse Bridge carries the M62 between junctions 36 and 37 over the River Ouse, north of Goole.

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Traffic to and from Hull to the A1 historically went over Boothferry Bridge on the A614.

The position of the bridge and the M62 resulted from a study carried out in 1964 by Scott Wilson Kirkpatrick & Partners. They would also design the bridge. It is a haunched girder bridge.

In the early stages an immersed tube tunnel was considered, which was thought to be too expensive. 1,310 metres (4,300 ft) of the River Ouse had to be bridged. The gradient of the road on the approach to the bridge is 1 in 33.

The Ouse Bridge Contract for £6.75 million (£71 million in today’s figures) was awarded in January 1973 to a consortium of Costain Civil Engineering and Redpath Dorman Long.

It was opened on 24 May 1976. It was the last section of the main part of the M62 to open.

Rakewood Viaduct

You are probably not likely to notice the Rakewood Viaduct. This is because its not something you’ll see, it is something you drive over.

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It carries the motorway over Rakewood Valley and Longden End Brook between junctions 21 and 22 at Littleborough in Greater Manchester.

The viaduct is 840 feet long and 140 feet above the valley floor. It was built in 1966 by Reed and Mallik Ltd and opened to motorway traffic in October 1971. It has a sister bridge, The Gathurst Viaduct which carries the M6 Motorway over the Leeds to Liverpool Canal, Manchester to Southport Railway and River Douglas and was constructed prior to the Rakewood Viaduct.

The steelwork deck was subcontracted to Robert Watson Steelwork Ltd of High Street Bolton. William Openshaw of Bolton was the foreman in charge of the steelwork. Eric Baldwin and Mark Baldwin both of Wigan were steel erectors during construction.

Due to the height of the bridge and the surrounding hillside exposure it is often subject to high speed cross winds.